Brattleboro Lodge No 102

Free & Accepted Masons

 
 
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Frequently Asked Questions

 

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  • What is Freemasonry?

  • What happens at a lodge meeting?

  • Why do Freemasons take oaths?

  • Are Freemasons expected to give preference to fellow members?

  • Who do the Masonic charities donate to?

  • Is Masonry a religion?

  • Why do some churches not like Freemasonry?

  • Does Freemasonry accept Roman Catholics?

  • Is Freemasonry a political pressure group?

  • Is Freemasonry an international order?

  • Why do you wear regalia?

  • How many Freemasons are there?

  • What are the Degrees of Freemasonry?

  • How much does it cost to be a Freemason?

  • Ancient Free & Accepted Mason vrs Free & Accepted Mason vrs Ancient Free Masons

  • The Regius Poem ( Halliwell MS ) c.1390

  • Are all lodges the same?

    Lodge buildings can be large or small, and so can lodge rooms. In some parts of the world, lodge rooms typically seat no more than 30 or 40 members, whereas many lodge rooms in the United States were built for hundreds. Often the difference is whether many small lodges meet in the same building or if one large lodge dominates the area. Most buildings generally have a dining room and, perhaps, other social rooms. Lodges can be well ornate or simple in design, however the inner chamber or meeting room in all lodges follow the same basic floor plan and are patterned after the aspects of King Solomon's Temple.

    A lodge room contains much that is based on interpretations of descriptions of Solomon's Temple. There are many variations throughout the world, depending on differences in customs, rituals, and rules, but in general, lodge rooms are arranged in a very similar fashion.

    Here's how a typical modern lodge may look like:

    • The modern Masonic lodge is a rectangular room, with seating around the perimeter. The ceremonies of the lodge take place in the center of the room, so everybody has a good view.
    • Lodge rooms are usually oriented east to west. Ancient temples were constructed this way to be aligned with the east-to-west path of the sun. Even if a Masonic building actually faces north and south, when you walk into the lodge room, you're symbolically facing the East.
    • There is an altar where the Bible (or other holy book sacred to that lodge's members) is opened. This book is referred to as the Volume of Sacred Law. In U.S. lodges, the altar is in the center of the room. In other parts of the world, the altar may be directly in front of the Master's chair.
    • Three candles are placed in a triangular position next to, or surrounding, the altar, to illuminate the Volume of Sacred Law.
    • Officers have chairs in specific positions in the room. The Master is in the east, on a raised platform of three steps. The Senior Warden is in the west on a platform of two steps, and the Junior Warden is in the south on one step. The steps symbolize the progression of life: youth, manhood, and age.
    • There are two tall pillars with globes on the top, patterned after two bronze columns that were prominent architectural features of Solomon's Temple. The pillars are usually on either side of the Senior Warden, or sometimes next to a doorway leading into the lodge.
    • An illuminated letter G is suspended over the Master's chair in the east, or sometimes over the altar. It represents both God and the science of geometry, which was the secret knowledge of the original stonemasons.


    Read more: http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/what-is-a-freemason-lodge.html#ixzz0dVKSQa4F
     

    A lodge room contains much that is based on interpretations of descriptions of Solomon's Temple. There are many variations throughout the world, depending on differences in customs, rituals, and rules, but in general, lodge rooms are arranged in a very similar fashion.

    Here's how a typical modern lodge may look like:

    • The modern Masonic lodge is a rectangular room, with seating around the perimeter. The ceremonies of the lodge take place in the center of the room, so everybody has a good view.
    • Lodge rooms are usually oriented east to west. Ancient temples were constructed this way to be aligned with the east-to-west path of the sun. Even if a Masonic building actually faces north and south, when you walk into the lodge room, you're symbolically facing the East.
    • There is an altar where the Bible (or other holy book sacred to that lodge's members) is opened. This book is referred to as the Volume of Sacred Law. In U.S. lodges, the altar is in the center of the room. In other parts of the world, the altar may be directly in front of the Master's chair.
    • Three candles are placed in a triangular position next to, or surrounding, the altar, to illuminate the Volume of Sacred Law.
    • Officers have chairs in specific positions in the room. The Master is in the east, on a raised platform of three steps. The Senior Warden is in the west on a platform of two steps, and the Junior Warden is in the south on one step. The steps symbolize the progression of life: youth, manhood, and age.
    • There are two tall pillars with globes on the top, patterned after two bronze columns that were prominent architectural features of Solomon's Temple. The pillars are usually on either side of the Senior Warden, or sometimes next to a doorway leading into the lodge.
    • An illuminated letter G is suspended over the Master's chair in the east, or sometimes over the altar. It represents both God and the science of geometry, which was the secret knowledge of the original stonemasons.


    Read more: http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/what-is-a-freemason-lodge.html#ixzz0dVKSQa4F
     

    A lodge room contains much that is based on interpretations of descriptions of Solomon's Temple. There are many variations throughout the world, depending on differences in customs, rituals, and rules, but in general, lodge rooms are arranged in a very similar fashion.

    Here's how a typical modern lodge may look like:

    • The modern Masonic lodge is a rectangular room, with seating around the perimeter. The ceremonies of the lodge take place in the center of the room, so everybody has a good view.
    • Lodge rooms are usually oriented east to west. Ancient temples were constructed this way to be aligned with the east-to-west path of the sun. Even if a Masonic building actually faces north and south, when you walk into the lodge room, you're symbolically facing the East.
    • There is an altar where the Bible (or other holy book sacred to that lodge's members) is opened. This book is referred to as the Volume of Sacred Law. In U.S. lodges, the altar is in the center of the room. In other parts of the world, the altar may be directly in front of the Master's chair.
    • Three candles are placed in a triangular position next to, or surrounding, the altar, to illuminate the Volume of Sacred Law.
    • Officers have chairs in specific positions in the room. The Master is in the east, on a raised platform of three steps. The Senior Warden is in the west on a platform of two steps, and the Junior Warden is in the south on one step. The steps symbolize the progression of life: youth, manhood, and age.
    • There are two tall pillars with globes on the top, patterned after two bronze columns that were prominent architectural features of Solomon's Temple. The pillars are usually on either side of the Senior Warden, or sometimes next to a doorway leading into the lodge.
    • An illuminated letter G is suspended over the Master's chair in the east, or sometimes over the altar. It represents both God and the science of geometry, which was the secret knowledge of the original stonemasons.


    Read more: http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/what-is-a-freemason-lodge.html#ixzz0dVKSQa4F
     

    A lodge room contains much that is based on interpretations of descriptions of Solomon's Temple. There are many variations throughout the world, depending on differences in customs, rituals, and rules, but in general, lodge rooms are arranged in a very similar fashion.

    Here's how a typical modern lodge may look like:

    • The modern Masonic lodge is a rectangular room, with seating around the perimeter. The ceremonies of the lodge take place in the center of the room, so everybody has a good view.
    • Lodge rooms are usually oriented east to west. Ancient temples were constructed this way to be aligned with the east-to-west path of the sun. Even if a Masonic building actually faces north and south, when you walk into the lodge room, you're symbolically facing the East.
    • There is an altar where the Bible (or other holy book sacred to that lodge's members) is opened. This book is referred to as the Volume of Sacred Law. In U.S. lodges, the altar is in the center of the room. In other parts of the world, the altar may be directly in front of the Master's chair.
    • Three candles are placed in a triangular position next to, or surrounding, the altar, to illuminate the Volume of Sacred Law.
    • Officers have chairs in specific positions in the room. The Master is in the east, on a raised platform of three steps. The Senior Warden is in the west on a platform of two steps, and the Junior Warden is in the south on one step. The steps symbolize the progression of life: youth, manhood, and age.
    • There are two tall pillars with globes on the top, patterned after two bronze columns that were prominent architectural features of Solomon's Temple. The pillars are usually on either side of the Senior Warden, or sometimes next to a doorway leading into the lodge.
    • An illuminated letter G is suspended over the Master's chair in the east, or sometimes over the altar. It represents both God and the science of geometry, which was the secret knowledge of the original stonemasons.


    Read more: http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/what-is-a-freemason-lodge.html#ixzz0dVKSQa4F
     
    Many of the details in a lodge room are patterned after aspects of King Solomon's Temple, as described in the Bible and other historical records. Freemasonry teaches by symbolism, and much of that symbolism is based upon the accounts of Solomon's Temple. The Temple was built in the 10th century B.C. on Mount Moriah in Jerusalem. Solomon built it as a temple to God and to store the sacred Ark of the Covenant, which contained the tablets of the Ten Commandments given by God to Moses. The details of Solomon's Temple are described in the Bible in 1 Kings and 2 Chronicles. In its time, the temple's magnificence was known all over the ancient world.

    Early stonemasons claimed their guilds originated with the great construction projects of the Bible, to give themselves a long, proud, and sacred pedigree. When Freemasonry became a philosophical organization in the 1700s, the Masons who developed the ceremonies and practices of the fraternity seized on the symbolism of Solomon's Temple to help teach moral and spiritual ideas.

    A lodge room contains much that is based on interpretations of descriptions of Solomon's Temple. There are many variations throughout the world, depending on differences in customs, rituals, and rules, but in general, lodge rooms are arranged in a very similar fashion.

    Here's how a typical modern lodge may look like:

    • The modern Masonic lodge is a rectangular room, with seating around the perimeter. The ceremonies of the lodge take place in the center of the room, so everybody has a good view.
    • Lodge rooms are usually oriented east to west. Ancient temples were constructed this way to be aligned with the east-to-west path of the sun. Even if a Masonic building actually faces north and south, when you walk into the lodge room, you're symbolically facing the East.
    • There is an altar where the Bible (or other holy book sacred to that lodge's members) is opened. This book is referred to as the Volume of Sacred Law. In U.S. lodges, the altar is in the center of the room. In other parts of the world, the altar may be directly in front of the Master's chair.
    • Three candles are placed in a triangular position next to, or surrounding, the altar, to illuminate the Volume of Sacred Law.
    • Officers have chairs in specific positions in the room. The Master is in the east, on a raised platform of three steps. The Senior Warden is in the west on a platform of two steps, and the Junior Warden is in the south on one step. The steps symbolize the progression of life: youth, manhood, and age.
    • There are two tall pillars with globes on the top, patterned after two bronze columns that were prominent architectural features of Solomon's Temple. The pillars are usually on either side of the Senior Warden, or sometimes next to a doorway leading into the lodge.
    • An illuminated letter G is suspended over the Master's chair in the east, or sometimes over the altar. It represents both God and the science of geometry, which was the secret knowledge of the original stonemasons.


    Read more: http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/what-is-a-freemason-lodge.html#ixzz0dVKzcmlp
     
    Many of the details in a lodge room are patterned after aspects of King Solomon's Temple, as described in the Bible and other historical records. Freemasonry teaches by symbolism, and much of that symbolism is based upon the accounts of Solomon's Temple. The Temple was built in the 10th century B.C. on Mount Moriah in Jerusalem. Solomon built it as a temple to God and to store the sacred Ark of the Covenant, which contained the tablets of the Ten Commandments given by God to Moses. The details of Solomon's Temple are described in the Bible in 1 Kings and 2 Chronicles. In its time, the temple's magnificence was known all over the ancient world.

    Early stonemasons claimed their guilds originated with the great construction projects of the Bible, to give themselves a long, proud, and sacred pedigree. When Freemasonry became a philosophical organization in the 1700s, the Masons who developed the ceremonies and practices of the fraternity seized on the symbolism of Solomon's Temple to help teach moral and spiritual ideas.

    A lodge room contains much that is based on interpretations of descriptions of Solomon's Temple. There are many variations throughout the world, depending on differences in customs, rituals, and rules, but in general, lodge rooms are arranged in a very similar fashion.

    Here's how a typical modern lodge may look like:

    • The modern Masonic lodge is a rectangular room, with seating around the perimeter. The ceremonies of the lodge take place in the center of the room, so everybody has a good view.
    • Lodge rooms are usually oriented east to west. Ancient temples were constructed this way to be aligned with the east-to-west path of the sun. Even if a Masonic building actually faces north and south, when you walk into the lodge room, you're symbolically facing the East.
    • There is an altar where the Bible (or other holy book sacred to that lodge's members) is opened. This book is referred to as the Volume of Sacred Law. In U.S. lodges, the altar is in the center of the room. In other parts of the world, the altar may be directly in front of the Master's chair.
    • Three candles are placed in a triangular position next to, or surrounding, the altar, to illuminate the Volume of Sacred Law.
    • Officers have chairs in specific positions in the room. The Master is in the east, on a raised platform of three steps. The Senior Warden is in the west on a platform of two steps, and the Junior Warden is in the south on one step. The steps symbolize the progression of life: youth, manhood, and age.
    • There are two tall pillars with globes on the top, patterned after two bronze columns that were prominent architectural features of Solomon's Temple. The pillars are usually on either side of the Senior Warden, or sometimes next to a doorway leading into the lodge.
    • An illuminated letter G is suspended over the Master's chair in the east, or sometimes over the altar. It represents both God and the science of geometry, which was the secret knowledge of the original stonemasons.


    Read more: http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/what-is-a-freemason-lodge.html#ixzz0dVKzcmlp
     
    Many of the details in a lodge room are patterned after aspects of King Solomon's Temple, as described in the Bible and other historical records. Freemasonry teaches by symbolism, and much of that symbolism is based upon the accounts of Solomon's Temple. The Temple was built in the 10th century B.C. on Mount Moriah in Jerusalem. Solomon built it as a temple to God and to store the sacred Ark of the Covenant, which contained the tablets of the Ten Commandments given by God to Moses. The details of Solomon's Temple are described in the Bible in 1 Kings and 2 Chronicles. In its time, the temple's magnificence was known all over the ancient world.

    Early stonemasons claimed their guilds originated with the great construction projects of the Bible, to give themselves a long, proud, and sacred pedigree. When Freemasonry became a philosophical organization in the 1700s, the Masons who developed the ceremonies and practices of the fraternity seized on the symbolism of Solomon's Temple to help teach moral and spiritual ideas.

    A lodge room contains much that is based on interpretations of descriptions of Solomon's Temple. There are many variations throughout the world, depending on differences in customs, rituals, and rules, but in general, lodge rooms are arranged in a very similar fashion.

    Here's how a typical modern lodge may look like:

    • The modern Masonic lodge is a rectangular room, with seating around the perimeter. The ceremonies of the lodge take place in the center of the room, so everybody has a good view.
    • Lodge rooms are usually oriented east to west. Ancient temples were constructed this way to be aligned with the east-to-west path of the sun. Even if a Masonic building actually faces north and south, when you walk into the lodge room, you're symbolically facing the East.
    • There is an altar where the Bible (or other holy book sacred to that lodge's members) is opened. This book is referred to as the Volume of Sacred Law. In U.S. lodges, the altar is in the center of the room. In other parts of the world, the altar may be directly in front of the Master's chair.
    • Three candles are placed in a triangular position next to, or surrounding, the altar, to illuminate the Volume of Sacred Law.
    • Officers have chairs in specific positions in the room. The Master is in the east, on a raised platform of three steps. The Senior Warden is in the west on a platform of two steps, and the Junior Warden is in the south on one step. The steps symbolize the progression of life: youth, manhood, and age.
    • There are two tall pillars with globes on the top, patterned after two bronze columns that were prominent architectural features of Solomon's Temple. The pillars are usually on either side of the Senior Warden, or sometimes next to a doorway leading into the lodge.
    • An illuminated letter G is suspended over the Master's chair in the east, or sometimes over the altar. It represents both God and the science of geometry, which was the secret knowledge of the original stonemasons.


    Read more: http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/what-is-a-freemason-lodge.html#ixzz0dVKzcmlp
     
    Many of the details in a lodge room are patterned after aspects of King Solomon's Temple, as described in the Bible and other historical records. Freemasonry teaches by symbolism, and much of that symbolism is based upon the accounts of Solomon's Temple. The Temple was built in the 10th century B.C. on Mount Moriah in Jerusalem. Solomon built it as a temple to God and to store the sacred Ark of the Covenant, which contained the tablets of the Ten Commandments given by God to Moses. The details of Solomon's Temple are described in the Bible in 1 Kings and 2 Chronicles. In its time, the temple's magnificence was known all over the ancient world.

    Early stonemasons claimed their guilds originated with the great construction projects of the Bible, to give themselves a long, proud, and sacred pedigree. When Freemasonry became a philosophical organization in the 1700s, the Masons who developed the ceremonies and practices of the fraternity seized on the symbolism of Solomon's Temple to help teach moral and spiritual ideas.

    A lodge room contains much that is based on interpretations of descriptions of Solomon's Temple. There are many variations throughout the world, depending on differences in customs, rituals, and rules, but in general, lodge rooms are arranged in a very similar fashion.

    Here's how a typical modern lodge may look like:

    • The modern Masonic lodge is a rectangular room, with seating around the perimeter. The ceremonies of the lodge take place in the center of the room, so everybody has a good view.
    • Lodge rooms are usually oriented east to west. Ancient temples were constructed this way to be aligned with the east-to-west path of the sun. Even if a Masonic building actually faces north and south, when you walk into the lodge room, you're symbolically facing the East.
    • There is an altar where the Bible (or other holy book sacred to that lodge's members) is opened. This book is referred to as the Volume of Sacred Law. In U.S. lodges, the altar is in the center of the room. In other parts of the world, the altar may be directly in front of the Master's chair.
    • Three candles are placed in a triangular position next to, or surrounding, the altar, to illuminate the Volume of Sacred Law.
    • Officers have chairs in specific positions in the room. The Master is in the east, on a raised platform of three steps. The Senior Warden is in the west on a platform of two steps, and the Junior Warden is in the south on one step. The steps symbolize the progression of life: youth, manhood, and age.
    • There are two tall pillars with globes on the top, patterned after two bronze columns that were prominent architectural features of Solomon's Temple. The pillars are usually on either side of the Senior Warden, or sometimes next to a doorway leading into the lodge.
    • An illuminated letter G is suspended over the Master's chair in the east, or sometimes over the altar. It represents both God and the science of geometry, which was the secret knowledge of the original stonemasons.


    Read more: http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/what-is-a-freemason-lodge.html#ixzz0dVKzcmlp
     
    Many of the details in a lodge room are patterned after aspects of King Solomon's Temple, as described in the Bible and other historical records. Freemasonry teaches by symbolism, and much of that symbolism is based upon the accounts of Solomon's Temple. The Temple was built in the 10th century B.C. on Mount Moriah in Jerusalem. Solomon built it as a temple to God and to store the sacred Ark of the Covenant, which contained the tablets of the Ten Commandments given by God to Moses. The details of Solomon's Temple are described in the Bible in 1 Kings and 2 Chronicles. In its time, the temple's magnificence was known all over the ancient world.

    Read more: http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/what-is-a-freemason-lodge.html#ixzz0dVL6wW0b
     
    Many of the details in a lodge room are patterned after aspects of King Solomon's Temple, as described in the Bible and other historical records. Freemasonry teaches by symbolism, and much of that symbolism is based upon the accounts of Solomon's Temple. The Temple was built in the 10th century B.C. on Mount Moriah in Jerusalem. Solomon built it as a temple to God and to store the sacred Ark of the Covenant, which contained the tablets of the Ten Commandments given by God to Moses. The details of Solomon's Temple are described in the Bible in 1 Kings and 2 Chronicles. In its time, the temple's magnificence was known all over the ancient world.

    Read more: http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/what-is-a-freemason-lodge.html#ixzz0dVL6wW0b
     
    Many of the details in a lodge room are patterned after aspects of King Solomon's Temple, as described in the Bible and other historical records. Freemasonry teaches by symbolism, and much of that symbolism is based upon the accounts of Solomon's Temple. The Temple was built in the 10th century B.C. on Mount Moriah in Jerusalem. Solomon built it as a temple to God and to store the sacred Ark of the Covenant, which contained the tablets of the Ten Commandments given by God to Moses. The details of Solomon's Temple are described in the Bible in 1 Kings and 2 Chronicles. In its time, the temple's magnificence was known all over the ancient world.

    Read more: http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/what-is-a-freemason-lodge.html#ixzz0dVL6wW0b
     

    A lodge room contains much that is based on interpretations of descriptions of Solomon's Temple. There are many variations throughout the world, depending on differences in customs, rituals, and rules, but in general, lodge rooms are arranged in a very similar fashion.

    Here's how a typical lodge may look like:

    • The Masonic lodge room is rectangular, with seating around the perimeter. The ceremonies of the lodge take place in the center of the room, so everybody has a good view.

    • Lodge rooms are usually oriented east to west. Ancient temples were constructed this way to be aligned with the east-to-west path of the sun. Even if a Masonic building actually faces north and south, when you walk into the lodge room, you're symbolically facing the East.

    • There is an altar where the Bible (or other holy book sacred to that lodge's members) is opened. This book is referred to as the Volume of Sacred Law. In U.S. lodges, the altar is in the center of the room. In other parts of the world, the altar may be directly in front of the Master's chair.

    • Three candles are placed in a triangular position next to, or surrounding, the altar, to illuminate the Volume of Sacred Law.

    • Officers have chairs in specific positions in the room. The Master is in the east, on a raised platform of three steps. The Senior Warden is in the west on a platform of two steps, and the Junior Warden is in the south on one step.

    • There are two tall pillars with globes on the top, patterned after two bronze columns that were prominent architectural features of Solomon's Temple. The pillars are usually on either side of the Senior Warden, or sometimes next to a doorway leading into the lodge.

    • An illuminated letter G is suspended over the Master's chair in the east, or sometimes over the altar.

     

 

 

 
 
   

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